Perot Museum sparks interest in STEM, offers programs for kids and teens

STEM, which stands for science, technology, engineering and math, are important subjects that the education system has been particularly interested in recently. Parents might have heard that the United States needs more students interested in STEM subjects for the country to remain a global leader. Another big STEM mission is to help female students gain interest and involvement in STEM subjects and future careers.

The Perot Museum. (Photo by Alexis Kopp)

The Perot Museum of Nature and Science is a great place to spark and nurture a student’s interest in STEM.

“Just about every aspect of STEM is covered in the Perot Museum in some way, shape, or form,” Senior PR and Communications Manager at the Perot Museum Krista Villarreal Moore said.

Along with 11 interactive exhibits, the Perot Museum offers kid and teen programs.

 

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Exhibits

There are 11 exhibits in the Perot Museum. The museum staff suggest starting at the top floor and working your way down.

(From left to right) Gracen Kopp (18), Kalina Kaftajian (18), and Tara Tzaferis (15). (Photo by Alexis Kopp)

On the fourth floor, experience flight in the Rose Hall of Birds and gaze upon fossils in the T Boone Pickens Life Then and Now Hall.

Learn all about the earth, energy, and gems and minerals on the third floor of the museum. You can even experience an earth quake on a simulation machine as part of The Rees-Jones Foundation Dynamic Earth Hall.

The second floor holds the secrets of the human body, as well as the Texas Instruments Engineering and Innovations Hall.

“I really enjoyed the activities on each floor of the museum,” Tara Tzaferis (15) said. “The Innovations Hall was probably my favorite.”

On the lower level, there is a children’s museum, learning labs, a sports exhibit, and the special, traveling exhibition. This summer the visiting exhibition is called Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed.

Discovery Camps

The Perot Museum offers camps for children in pre-kindergarten through the sixth grade called Discovery Camps. These camps happen year-round during Thanksgiving break, winter break, spring break, and summer break.

Each program lasts a week long and focuses on a different aspect of STEM including space, paleontology, and innovation. These camps are led by Perot Museum staff educators that believe hands-on learning is the best for young students.

“Kids don’t realize they’re learning when they are having so much fun and touching and feeling these topics that excite them,” Moore said.

Discovery Corps

The Discovery Corps is a group of high schoolers who assist the educators during Discovery Camps. The members of the Discovery Corps may become volunteers at the Perot Museum after the summer session is complete.

(From left to right) Senior PR and Communications Manager Krista Villarreal Moore and Director of Volunteer Studies Jane Mullins. (Photo by Alexis Kopp)

“This program is helping teens prepare for the real world, whether it’s a college application or a job,” Director of Volunteer Studies Jane Mullins said.

To become a member, high schoolers must send the Perot Museum a resume and go through an interview process. Eighty high school volunteers were selected.

After their duties during a Discovery Camp are over, the Discovery Corps work together on a project of their choice. At the end of the summer, the students will present their project to museum staff and their parents. Sometimes the Discovery Corps projects are chosen to be used in the museum.

 

With Discovery Camps, Discovery Corps, traveling exhibitions, and hands-on learning, the Perot Museum has a lot to offer students this summer.

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